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NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Completes Sixth Jupiter Flyby

NASA’s Juno booster successfully done a sixth tighten flyby of Jupiter on Friday, May 19, 2017, during 2 a.m. EDT (6 a.m. UTC; 11 p.m. PDT on May 18).

Juno prisoner this picture 6,247 miles (10,053) km from Jupiter’s cloud tops during a tighten flyby on May 19, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS.

Juno prisoner this picture 6,247 miles (10,053) km from Jupiter’s cloud tops during a tighten flyby on May 19, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS.

At a time of a closest approach, Juno was about 2,200 miles (3,500 km) above Jupiter’s puzzling cloud tops.

All of Juno’s scholarship instruments and a JunoCam were handling during a flyby, collecting information that is now being returned to Earth.

Juno prisoner this picture 4,761 miles (7,662 km) from Jupiter’s cloud tops during a tighten flyby on May 19, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS.

Juno prisoner this picture 4,761 miles (7,662 km) from Jupiter’s cloud tops during a tighten flyby on May 19, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS.

“At a time of perijove (defined as a indicate in Juno’s circuit when it is closest to a planet’s center), a course of a booster was optimized for sobriety studies, to know some-more about a interior structure of Jupiter,” a goal scientists said.

“That means that we had radio hit with a booster via a perijove pass,” they explained.

“That in spin means that we were means to downlink information a whole time.”

Juno prisoner this picture 10,096 miles (16,248 km) from Jupiter’s cloud tops during a tighten flyby on May 19, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS.

Juno prisoner this picture 10,096 miles (16,248 km) from Jupiter’s cloud tops during a tighten flyby on May 19, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS.

Juno’s subsequent tighten flyby of Jupiter will start on Jul 11, 2017, holding it over Jupiter’s Great Red Spot.