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Cassini Captures Breathtaking View of Saturn’s Moon Mimas

This picture of Saturn’s seventh largest moon, Mimas, was photographed when NASA’s Cassini booster was approximately 115,000 miles (185,000 km) away.

NASA’s Cassini booster performed this picture of Mimas on Oct. 22, 2016. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute.

NASA’s Cassini booster performed this picture of Mimas on Oct. 22, 2016. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute.

Mimas, also famous as Saturn I, is a innermost and smallest of Saturn’s categorical moons.

It was detected on Sept. 17, 1789 by English astronomer William Herschel and named for one of a Giants of Greek mythology.

Mimas is approximately 246 miles (396 km) across.

It revolves around Saturn in a prograde, near-circular circuit during a meant stretch of about 117,000 miles (189,000 km).

Because of tidal interactions with Saturn, Mimas rotates synchronously with a orbital motion, always gripping a same hemisphere toward a world and always heading with a same hemisphere in orbit.

Mimas’ aspect is icy and heavily cratered.

One of a craters, Herschel, is surprisingly vast in comparison to a distance of a icy moon.

Named after a moon’s discoverer, a void stretches roughly 81 miles (130 km) far-reaching — roughly one-third of a hole of Mimas itself.

Large impact craters mostly have peaks in their center. Herschel’s rise stands scarcely as high as Mount Everest on Earth.

This picture was taken with Cassini’s narrow-angle camera on Oct. 22, 2016, regulating a multiple of filters that preferentially admits wavelengths of UV light centered during 338 nm.