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Cassini Beams Back New Image of Saturn’s Moon Iapetus

A new picture of Saturn’s yin-yang moon, Iapetus, was recently prisoner by NASA’s Cassini probe, now in a ‘Grand Finale’ phase.

This picture of Iapetus was taken with Cassini’s narrow-angle camera on Mar 11, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute.

This picture of Iapetus was taken with Cassini’s narrow-angle camera on Mar 11, 2017. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute.

Iapetus, also famous as Saturn VIII, was detected on Oct 25, 1671, by a Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini.

Saturn’s third largest moon, Iapetus is 914 miles (1,471 km) opposite and has a firmness usually 1.2 times that of glass water.

It orbits during 2.2 million miles (3.56 million km) from Saturn and is in inflection with Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, that orbits during 759,200 miles (1.22 million km).

Iapetus is a universe of contrast, with light and dim regions wise together like vast nonplus pieces.

Cassini Regio on Iapetus is lonesome in a covering of dark, dry element formulating a sheer contrariety to a most brighter segment that surrounds it.

This leads to a moon’s distinctive, two-toned appearance.

This picture was acquired with Cassini’s narrow-angle camera on Mar 11, 2017, during a stretch of about 1.6 million miles (2.6 million km) from Iapetus.

The perspective looks toward Saturn-facing hemisphere of Iapetus.

North on Iapetus is adult and rotated 20 degrees to a right.