Study: Male Great Tits Choose Their Neighbors Based on Personality
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Study: Male Great Tits Choose Their Neighbors Based on Personality

Male great tits (Parus major) choose neighbors with similar personalities to their own, according to new research from the University of Oxford, UK. Johnson et al assessed whether…

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Three Subspecies of Snow Leopard Revealed
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Three Subspecies of Snow Leopard Revealed

There are three different subspecies of the snow leopard (Panthera uncia), the world’s most elusive large big cat, according to a new study published in the Journal of…

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New Species of Butterfly Discovered in Israel: Acentria’s Fritillary
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New Species of Butterfly Discovered in Israel: Acentria’s Fritillary

A new species of the butterfly genus Melitaea has been discovered in northern Israel, according to a paper published in the journal Comparative Cytogenetics. The Acentria’s fritillary (Melitaea…

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New Study Expands Understanding of How DNA is Organized in Human Cells
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New Study Expands Understanding of How DNA is Organized in Human Cells

After decades of research aiming to understand how DNA is organized in our cells, a team of researchers from the Gladstone Institutes, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and…

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Leaf-Mimicking Insect, Freshwater Stingray, Omnivorous Rat among ESF’s Top 10 Species of 2016
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Leaf-Mimicking Insect, Freshwater Stingray, Omnivorous Rat among ESF’s Top 10 Species of 2016

An international team of taxonomists led by experts at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) selected the top 10 from among the approximately 18,000 new…

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Meet Sao Tome Grosbeak, World’s Largest Canary
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Meet Sao Tome Grosbeak, World’s Largest Canary

A critically endangered bird species called the São Tomé grosbeak is the world’s largest canary, 50% heavier than the next largest species, according to a new study published…

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New Glassfrog Species Discovered in Ecuador
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New Glassfrog Species Discovered in Ecuador

Herpetologists are claiming they have discovered a new species of frog living in the Amazonian lowlands of Ecuador. The Yaku glassfrog (Hyalinobatrachium yaku) in life. Top row: adult…

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Chimpanzees Show ‘Cumulative Culture’
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Chimpanzees Show ‘Cumulative Culture’

Chimpanzees share our human ability to amass knowledge, a new study led by a University of St Andrews researcher has found. Chimpanzees share the human capacity to build…

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Cryptic New Species of Flying Squirrel Identified in North America
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Cryptic New Species of Flying Squirrel Identified in North America

Scientists reporting in the Journal of Mammalogy on May 30 have identified a new species of flying squirrel living in the Pacific Coast region of North America. The…

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SYMPHY: Researchers Propose New ‘Tree of Life’ Framework that Incorporates Symbiomes
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SYMPHY: Researchers Propose New ‘Tree of Life’ Framework that Incorporates Symbiomes

In 1859, Charles Darwin included a novel tree of life in his book ‘On the Origin of Species.’ Now, a Rutgers University-led research team wants to reshape Darwin’s…

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New Species of Cottontail Rabbit Identified: Sylvilagus parentum
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New Species of Cottontail Rabbit Identified: Sylvilagus parentum

A new species of cottontail rabbit (genus Sylvilagus) has been described from the lowlands of western Suriname by Portland State University Professor Luis Ruedas. The Suriname lowland forest…

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Three New Chameleon Species Discovered in Central Africa
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Three New Chameleon Species Discovered in Central Africa

A team of herpetologists, led by Dr. Eli Greenbaum, associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Texas at El Paso, has discovered three new species of…

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Critically Endangered Dryas Monkeys Caught on Video
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Critically Endangered Dryas Monkeys Caught on Video

Using camera traps, primatologists from the Lukuru Foundation Tshuapa-Lomani-Lualaba (TL2) Project are the first to capture video footage of a previously unknown population of the critically endangered Dryas…

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Unique Reversible Saliva Keeps Frog Tongues Sticky
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Unique Reversible Saliva Keeps Frog Tongues Sticky

According to a new study published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, a frog’s saliva is thick and sticky during prey capture, then turns thin and…

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Stable Semi-Synthetic Bacterium Created
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Stable Semi-Synthetic Bacterium Created

Researchers from the United States, China and France have created what they say is the world’s first stable semi-synthetic microorganism. The research appears in the Proceedings of the…

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Thylacine Had Brain Structure Suited to Predatory Life Style
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Thylacine Had Brain Structure Suited to Predatory Life Style

A duo of researchers from the United States and Australia has used an imaging technique to reconstruct the brain architecture and neural networks of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus),…

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Ruby Seadragon Filmed Alive in Ocean for First Time
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Ruby Seadragon Filmed Alive in Ocean for First Time

A team of marine biologists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Western Australia Museum has captured on video the first-ever field sighting of the recently-discovered species of…

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Hoolock tianxing: New Species of Gibbon Discovered in Myanmar and China
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Hoolock tianxing: New Species of Gibbon Discovered in Myanmar and China

A new species of hoolock gibbon has been discovered in eastern Myanmar and southwestern China by an international team of scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom,…

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Study: Endogenous Retroviruses in Genome Important for Human Brain
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Study: Endogenous Retroviruses in Genome Important for Human Brain

About 8% of the human genome is composed of endogenous retroviruses. According to a new study published in the journal Cell Reports, these retroviruses may have played a…

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Bryanites graeffii: New Beetle Species Described from 150-Year-Old Museum Specimen
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Bryanites graeffii: New Beetle Species Described from 150-Year-Old Museum Specimen

A new species of ground beetle has been identified by Cornell University Professor James Liebherr. Holotype specimen of Bryanites graeffii. Image credit: J.K. Liebherr. “Bryanites graeffii is described…

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Retroviruses Originated in Ocean 450 Million Years Ago, New Study Says
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Retroviruses Originated in Ocean 450 Million Years Ago, New Study Says

Retroviruses (Retroviridae) — a family of viruses that includes pathogens such as HIV, feline leukemia, and several cancer-causing viruses — have an ancient marine origin and originated together…

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Hummingbirds Process Motion in Unique Way, Study Shows
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Hummingbirds Process Motion in Unique Way, Study Shows

According to new research published in the journal Current Biology, a key area of the hummingbird brain processes motion in a unique, unexpected way. The Anna’s hummingbird (Calypte…

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Biologists Discover New Type of Microbial Photosynthesis
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Biologists Discover New Type of Microbial Photosynthesis

An international team of biologists led by Washington State University Professor Haluk Beyenal has discovered a new type of cooperative photosynthesis that could be used in microbial communities…

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Researchers Discover Off-Switch for CRISPR-Cas9 System
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Researchers Discover Off-Switch for CRISPR-Cas9 System

A team of scientists at the University of California, San Francisco, has discovered a way to inactivate the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system using newly identified bacteriophage proteins. The study…

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New Estimate: There are Over 18,000 Bird Species on Earth
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New Estimate: There are Over 18,000 Bird Species on Earth

A new study published in the journal PLoS ONE suggests that there are 18,043 bird species in the world — nearly twice as many as previously thought. Toucan.…

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Pointy-Nosed Blue Chimaera Spotted in North Pacific Ocean
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Pointy-Nosed Blue Chimaera Spotted in North Pacific Ocean

A large deep-water fish that was previously identified in the Southeastern Pacific has recently been found around the Hawaiian Islands and off the coast of Central California, according…

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Mysterious Sound Recorded in Mariana Trench Believed to be from Minke Whales
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Mysterious Sound Recorded in Mariana Trench Believed to be from Minke Whales

A strange sound in the Mariana Trench notable for its complexity likely represents the discovery of a new minke whale call, says a team of marine researchers from…

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Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria Found Deep in New Mexico’s Lechuguilla Cave
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Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria Found Deep in New Mexico’s Lechuguilla Cave

According to a team of researchers led by Gerald Wright, a professor of biochemistry and biomedical sciences at McMaster University, Lechuguilla Cave — an underground ecosystem that has…

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Mysterious Deep-Sea Animal Rediscovered after 116 Years
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Mysterious Deep-Sea Animal Rediscovered after 116 Years

Bathochordaeus charon — an extremely rare species of giant larvacean — has been rediscovered, more than a century after the only previous known specimens of the species were…

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Only Half of Chromosome is DNA, New Study Reveals
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Only Half of Chromosome is DNA, New Study Reveals

DNA makes up only half of the material inside chromosomes, according to a new study published in the journal Molecular Cell. Up to 47% of their structure is…

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Hen Harrier is Actually Two Different Species
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Hen Harrier is Actually Two Different Species

New research confirms that the hen harrier (Circus cyaneus), a medium-sized bird of prey found in parts of North America and Eurasia, is two different species of bird…

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LITE-1: Researchers Discover New Type of Photoreceptor
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LITE-1: Researchers Discover New Type of Photoreceptor

Scientists have discovered a new type of photoreceptor protein that is about 50 times more efficient at capturing light than the rhodopsin, a protein that resides in cell…

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Brazilian Capuchin Monkeys Unintentionally Make Sharp-Edged Stone Flakes
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Brazilian Capuchin Monkeys Unintentionally Make Sharp-Edged Stone Flakes

A University of Oxford-led team of scientists has observed bearded capuchins (Sapajus libidinosus) in Brazil deliberately break stones, unintentionally producing sharp-edged flakes that have the characteristics and morphology…

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Jumping Spiders Can ‘Hear’ Sounds over Greater Distances than Previously Thought
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Jumping Spiders Can ‘Hear’ Sounds over Greater Distances than Previously Thought

Spiders are sensitive to airborne vibrations from nearby sources. They are supposed to respond to sounds and ‘hear,’ but only when the sound is coming from a few…

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New Species of Drywood Termite Discovered in Colombia
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New Species of Drywood Termite Discovered in Colombia

A new species of drywood termite has been described from tropical dry forests of Colombia’s Caribbean coast. Proneotermes macondianus. Scale bars – 0.5 mm. Image credit: Casalla R.…

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Three New Species of Forest Robin Discovered in Africa
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Three New Species of Forest Robin Discovered in Africa

Researchers have described three new species in the previously monotypic bird genus Stiphrornis: two from West Africa and one from the Congo. Stiphrornis erythothorax, until now the only…

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Common Swifts Can Stay Ten Months in Air without Landing, Claim Ornithologists
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Common Swifts Can Stay Ten Months in Air without Landing, Claim Ornithologists

Common swifts (Apus apus) remain airborne for 10 months of their non-breeding period, according to a new study by Lund University ornithologists. A common swift (Apus apus). Image…

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Researchers Discover New Species of Leggy Millipede in California
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Researchers Discover New Species of Leggy Millipede in California

A new species of millipede, called Illacme tobini, has been discovered in a cave in Sequoia National Park, California. Illacme tobini. Scale bar – 1 mm. Image credit:…

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Brazilian Free-Tailed Bat is Fastest Flying Animal, New Study Says
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Brazilian Free-Tailed Bat is Fastest Flying Animal, New Study Says

A study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science shows that the Brazilian free-tailed bat can achieve flight speeds of 100 mph (160 km per hour) —…

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Chimps Discovered Using Tools to Fish for Algae
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Chimps Discovered Using Tools to Fish for Algae

Chimpanzees in Guinea are regularly using long and robust tools to fish for algae, reveals new research published this month in the American Journal of Primatology. Chimpanzee fishing…

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Plant-Eating Mammals Have Bigger Bellies, Claims New Study
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Plant-Eating Mammals Have Bigger Bellies, Claims New Study

Herbivorous, or plant-eating, mammals have bigger bellies than their usually slim carnivorous counterparts, according to a study led by University of Zurich researcher Marcus Clauss. Hippo family in…

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Researchers Discover How Piezo Protein Senses Touch
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Researchers Discover How Piezo Protein Senses Touch

A new study published in the journal Cell Reports reveals that a protein called Piezo 1 is directly responsible for sensing touch. Knowledge about Piezo 1 could be…

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Goffin’s Cockatoos Filmed Making Same Tool Type from Different Materials
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Goffin’s Cockatoos Filmed Making Same Tool Type from Different Materials

An international team of researchers from Austria and the UK has shown that Goffin’s cockatoos (Cacatua goffiniana) can manufacture and use stick-type tools of appropriate shape and length…

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Yellow-Bellied Kingsnake is Actually Three Separate Species
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Yellow-Bellied Kingsnake is Actually Three Separate Species

According to a new study published in the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, the yellow-bellied kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster), a snake found across a large swath of the eastern…

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Study: Great Apes Understand False Beliefs
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Study: Great Apes Understand False Beliefs

According to a new study published in the journal Science, three different species of great apes — chimpanzee, bonobo, and orangutan — are able to anticipate that others…

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Bumblebees Can Learn to Pull Strings for Reward, New Study Shows
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Bumblebees Can Learn to Pull Strings for Reward, New Study Shows

String pulling is a popular problem-solving task for investigating cognitive abilities in apes and birds, but has never been tested in insects. Now, buff-tailed bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) have…

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New Link Found between Body Fat, Fecal Bacteria
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New Link Found between Body Fat, Fecal Bacteria

An international team of scientists has found a new link between the diversity of bacteria in the human fecal microbiome and levels of visceral fat (body fat that…

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Study: Great Tits Choose Spring Neighbors Based on Winter Friendships
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Study: Great Tits Choose Spring Neighbors Based on Winter Friendships

Great tits (Parus major) pick their spring breeding sites to be near their winter flockmates, according to a new study by scientists at the University of Oxford, UK.…

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American Alligator’s Lineage is More Ancient than Previously Thought
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American Alligator’s Lineage is More Ancient than Previously Thought

According to new research, American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) have remained virtually untouched by evolutionary change for at least 8 million years — up to 6 million years older…

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Study: Pigeons Can Learn to Visually Recognize Words
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Study: Pigeons Can Learn to Visually Recognize Words

Pigeons (Columba livia) can learn to distinguish real words from non-words by visually processing their letter combinations, according to a surprising new study led by University of Otago…

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Anthophora pueblo: Newly-Discovered Species of Bee Excavates Sandstone Nests
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Anthophora pueblo: Newly-Discovered Species of Bee Excavates Sandstone Nests

A team of entomologists led by Utah State University researcher Dr. Michael Orr has described an unusual new species of bee from the deserts of the southwestern United…

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Hawaiian Crows Show Talent for Tool Use
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Hawaiian Crows Show Talent for Tool Use

A team of scientists led by Dr. Christian Rutz, a researcher at the Centre for Biological Diversity at the University of St Andrews, UK, has discovered that the…

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Scientists Develop Forensic Method to Identify Humans Using Hair Proteins
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Scientists Develop Forensic Method to Identify Humans Using Hair Proteins

A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-led interdisciplinary research team has developed the first-ever biological identification method that exploits the information encoded in proteins of human hair. A colorized scanning…

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Prognathodes basabei: New Species of Butterflyfish Discovered in Hawaiian Waters
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Prognathodes basabei: New Species of Butterflyfish Discovered in Hawaiian Waters

A new species of the butterflyfish genus Prognathodes has been described from several specimens collected at depths of 180-200 feet (55-61 m) off Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern…

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Genetic Analysis Reveals Four Distinct Giraffe Species Instead of One
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Genetic Analysis Reveals Four Distinct Giraffe Species Instead of One

Giraffes actually are not one species, but four, according to a new study published in the journal Current Biology. Reticulated giraffe (G. reticulata) in Samburu NP, Kenya. Image…

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Brazilian Capuchins Have Used Stone Tools for at least 600 Years
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Brazilian Capuchins Have Used Stone Tools for at least 600 Years

Wild Brazilian bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) use stones to pound open defended food, including cashew nuts. And this activity dates back at least 600 to 700 years,…

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Mantis Shrimp Use Eye Rotations to Enhance Their Polarization Vision, Say Biologists
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Mantis Shrimp Use Eye Rotations to Enhance Their Polarization Vision, Say Biologists

The eye-rolling behavior of mantis shrimp helps them see the world, says a team of biologists led by Nicholas Roberts of the University of Bristol, UK. Mantis shrimp…

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Why Don’t Plants Get Sunburn?
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Why Don’t Plants Get Sunburn?

Sunflowers. Image credit: Betty Jo Tindle / CC BY-SA 3.0. The one fact about plants that most people probably remember from school is that they use sunlight to…

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Viruses are Dominant Driver of Human Evolution, Researchers Say
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Viruses are Dominant Driver of Human Evolution, Researchers Say

In a new study published in the journal eLife, scientists apply big-data analysis to reveal the full extent of viruses’ impact on the evolution of humans and other…

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Study: Happy Cows Make Better Milk
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Study: Happy Cows Make Better Milk

Daily infusions with serotonin, a naturally-occurring chemical associated with feelings of happiness, were shown to increase calcium levels in both the blood and milk of dairy cows. The…

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Talamancan Palm-Pitviper: Cryptic New Species of Venomous Snake Identified in Costa Rica
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Talamancan Palm-Pitviper: Cryptic New Species of Venomous Snake Identified in Costa Rica

An international team of researchers led by University of Central Florida biologist Chris Parkinson has announced the discovery of a new species of venomous pitviper from Costa Rica.…

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Study with Aye-Ayes, Slow Loris Sheds Light on Origins of Alcohol Consumption
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Study with Aye-Ayes, Slow Loris Sheds Light on Origins of Alcohol Consumption

In the first controlled study of its kind, a team of scientists at Dartmouth College has found that two species of non-human primates – the slow loris (Nycticebus…

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Evidence Indicates Presence of Undescribed Beaked Whale Species in North Pacific
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Evidence Indicates Presence of Undescribed Beaked Whale Species in North Pacific

An international team of marine biologists has found genetic evidence of a previously unknown species of beaked whale (Berardius sp.nov.) that ranges from northern Japan across the Pacific…

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Genetic Code is More Diverse than We Think
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Genetic Code is More Diverse than We Think

New research is casting doubt on a widely held belief about how cells use DNA to make proteins. DNA molecule. Image credit: Christoph Bock, Max Planck Institute for…

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Indianapolis Zoo’s Orangutan Mimics Human Speech
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Indianapolis Zoo’s Orangutan Mimics Human Speech

Rocky, an eleven-year-old male orangutan living at Indianapolis Zoo, offers clues to how human speech evolved, according to new research led by Durham University’s Adriano Lameira. Orangutans (Pongo…

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Four New Species of Ants Discovered – Two Named after Game of Thrones’ Dragons
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Four New Species of Ants Discovered – Two Named after Game of Thrones’ Dragons

A group of Japanese entomologists has described and named four new species of the ant genus Pheidole from the tropical rainforests of Papua New Guinea and the Fijian…

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Sunflowers Use Internal Circadian Clock to Follow Sun
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Sunflowers Use Internal Circadian Clock to Follow Sun

A team of scientists led by Prof. Stacey Harmer of the University of California, Davis, has discovered how sunflowers use their circadian clock, acting on growth hormones, to…

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Greenland Sharks are Longest-Lived Vertebrates on Earth, Marine Biologists Say
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Greenland Sharks are Longest-Lived Vertebrates on Earth, Marine Biologists Say

Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) live at least as long as 400 years, according to a team of marine biologists led by Dr. Julius Nielsen from the University of…

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Zenkerella insignis: Scientists Analyze DNA of Enigmatic African Rodent
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Zenkerella insignis: Scientists Analyze DNA of Enigmatic African Rodent

For the first time, scientists have sequenced and analyzed the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA of the Cameroon scaly-tail (Zenkerella insignis), one of Africa’s most elusive mammals. The Cameroon…

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Geophis lorancai: New Species of Earth Snake Found in Mexico
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Geophis lorancai: New Species of Earth Snake Found in Mexico

A team of scientists has described a new strikingly-colored species in the snake genus Geophis from the mountains of the Sierra Zongolica in west-central Veracruz and the Sierra…

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1,075-Year-Old Bosnian Pine Among Europe’s Oldest Known Living Trees
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1,075-Year-Old Bosnian Pine Among Europe’s Oldest Known Living Trees

According to a team of botanists and dendrochronologists from the University of Arizona, Stockholm University and the University of Mainz, a pine growing in the Pindos Mountains in…

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Guaico Culex Virus: Researchers Find Multicomponent Animal Virus
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Guaico Culex Virus: Researchers Find Multicomponent Animal Virus

For the first time, researchers have identified a multicomponent RNA virus – one containing different segments of genetic material in separate particles, rather than a single strand of…

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Tasmanian Devils Rapidly Evolve to Overcome Facial Tumor Disease
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Tasmanian Devils Rapidly Evolve to Overcome Facial Tumor Disease

An international group of researchers has discovered that two regions in the genomes of Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are changing in response to the spread of a recently…

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Dogs Understand Words and Intonation of Human Speech, New Study Finds
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Dogs Understand Words and Intonation of Human Speech, New Study Finds

According to a study led by Dr. Attila Andics of the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary, dogs use the left hemisphere to process words and the auditory…

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Madagascarophis lolo: New Species of Cat-Eyed Snake Discovered in Madagascar
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Madagascarophis lolo: New Species of Cat-Eyed Snake Discovered in Madagascar

An international team of researchers from the United States and Madagascar has described a new, possibly microendemic, species of the snake genus Madagascarophis from the tsingy karst massif…

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