Archaeologists Uncover Roman Theater, Bathhouse at Hippos-Sussita
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Archaeologists Uncover Roman Theater, Bathhouse at Hippos-Sussita

A team of archaeologists from the the University of Haifa has discovered a large theater and a public bathhouse at the archaeological site of the ancient city of…

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38,000-Year-Old Aurignacian Artwork Found in France
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38,000-Year-Old Aurignacian Artwork Found in France

Researchers have uncovered a 38,000-year-old engraved image at Abri Blanchard, an Upper Paleolithic site of the Aurignacian culture — a finding that marks some of the earliest known…

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King Solomon-Era Fortification Unearthed in Israel’s Timna Valley
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King Solomon-Era Fortification Unearthed in Israel’s Timna Valley

A team of Tel Aviv University archaeologists has uncovered a gatehouse and associated livestock pens — dating to the reign of Kings Solomon and David (10th century BC)…

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Ancient Pueblo People Used Unexpectedly Advanced Geometry to Build Monuments
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Ancient Pueblo People Used Unexpectedly Advanced Geometry to Build Monuments

Arizona State University Professor Sherry Towers has examined the Sun Temple archaeological site at Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado, and found evidence that the site was laid out…

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Ground-Penetrating Radar Helps Archaeologists Find Viking Age Manor
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Ground-Penetrating Radar Helps Archaeologists Find Viking Age Manor

A large manor has been found at the archaeological site of Korshamn near the Viking Age proto-town of Birka in Sweden. Artist’s impression of the Viking Age manor…

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Ground-Penetrating Radar Helps Archaeologists Find Viking Age Manor
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Ground-Penetrating Radar Helps Archaeologists Find Viking Age Manor

A large manor has been found at the archaeological site of Korshamn near the Viking Age proto-town of Birka in Sweden. Artist’s impression of the Viking Age manor…

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Neanderthals Capable of Incorporating Symbolic Objects into Their Culture, Discovery Suggests
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Neanderthals Capable of Incorporating Symbolic Objects into Their Culture, Discovery Suggests

An unusual limestone rock found at an archaeological site in Croatia indicates that Neanderthals were capable of incorporating symbolic objects into their culture. ‘Clam-shell’ view of Side A…

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Humans Arrived in North America around 24,000 Years Ago
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Humans Arrived in North America around 24,000 Years Ago

Humans first arrived in North America 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to an analysis of ancient animal bones found in northern Yukon, Canada. Top: cut marks…

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Archaeologists Unearth 1,500-Year-Old Settlement, Precious Jewelry in England
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Archaeologists Unearth 1,500-Year-Old Settlement, Precious Jewelry in England

Archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology working at Cherry Hinton in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, have uncovered a wealth of Roman and Anglo-Saxon finds, as well as shed light on the…

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Study Sheds New Light on Peopling of Tibet
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Study Sheds New Light on Peopling of Tibet

A new analysis of Chusang, an archeological site on the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau, suggests that permanent residents may have set up camp thousands of years sooner than previously…

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Study: Ancient Inhabitants of Chaco Canyon Likely Relied on Imported Corn
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Study: Ancient Inhabitants of Chaco Canyon Likely Relied on Imported Corn

According to a new study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, the ancient inhabitants of Chaco Canyon likely had to import corn to feed the multitudes…

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Israeli Archaeologists Find Fragment of 2,100-Year-Old Engraved Stone Bowl
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Israeli Archaeologists Find Fragment of 2,100-Year-Old Engraved Stone Bowl

Archaeologists digging at a site in the City of David, in the Jerusalem Walls National Park, have found a fragment of a rare ancient bowl. The fragment of…

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Israeli Archaeologists Find Unique 3,800-Year-Old Ceramic Vessel
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Israeli Archaeologists Find Unique 3,800-Year-Old Ceramic Vessel

Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists working at Yehud in the Central District of Israel have uncovered an ancient ceramic jug, about 3,800 years old. The 3,800-year-old jug, which was…

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Archaeologists Find Compelling Evidence for New Pharaonic Tombs in Egypt
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Archaeologists Find Compelling Evidence for New Pharaonic Tombs in Egypt

Archaeologists from the University of Birmingham and the Egypt Exploration Society (EES) Qubbet el-Hawa Research Project (QHRP) yesterday announced the discovery of a 6.5-foot (2 m) high ancient…

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Oldest Evidence for Plant Processing in Pottery Found
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Oldest Evidence for Plant Processing in Pottery Found

An international team of archaeologists has discovered the earliest evidence of humans processing plants for food found anywhere in the world. The findings are reported in the journal…

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Researchers Obtain First Reliable Radiocarbon Dates for Australian Aboriginal Rock Art
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Researchers Obtain First Reliable Radiocarbon Dates for Australian Aboriginal Rock Art

A novel technique developed by a team of researchers in Australia has made it possible to produce some of the first reliable radiocarbon dates for Australian rock art.…

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Archaeologists Find Previously Unknown Ancient City in Greece
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Archaeologists Find Previously Unknown Ancient City in Greece

An international team of archaeologists from Sweden, Greece and the United Kingdom is exploring the ruins of a previously unknown ancient city at the village of Vlochos, municipality…

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World’s Very First Polluted River? Scientists Find Evidence of Ancient Metallurgical Activity in Jordan
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World’s Very First Polluted River? Scientists Find Evidence of Ancient Metallurgical Activity in Jordan

A research team led by Liverpool John Moores University scientists has discovered what could be the world’s very first polluted river, contaminated 7,000 years ago. In a now-dry…

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Mummified Remains Identified as Queen Nefertari, Pharaoh Ramesses II’s Royal Spouse
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Mummified Remains Identified as Queen Nefertari, Pharaoh Ramesses II’s Royal Spouse

A pair of mummified knees on display in the Egyptian Museum in Turin, Italy, belongs to Egyptian Queen Nefertari, the favorite wife of Pharaoh Ramesses II, according to…

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Middle Eastern Bitumen Found in Early Medieval Buried Ship in UK
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Middle Eastern Bitumen Found in Early Medieval Buried Ship in UK

Bitumen — a rare, tar-like material — from the Middle East is present in the 7th century Anglo-Saxon ship-burial at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, UK, according to a study…

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Indus Civilization Farmers Cultivated Rice Over 4,000 Years Ago, Archaeological Evidence Suggests
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Indus Civilization Farmers Cultivated Rice Over 4,000 Years Ago, Archaeological Evidence Suggests

New research on three archaeological sites of the famed Indus Valley civilization (3000-1500 BC) in north-west India has revealed that domesticated rice farming in South Asia began far…

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Turkeys Were Part of Native American Life Centuries before First Thanksgiving
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Turkeys Were Part of Native American Life Centuries before First Thanksgiving

According to a new study by Florida State University researchers, Native Americans were keeping eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) as early as 1200 – 1400 CE. A…

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Ancient Zapotecs Kept and Bred Turkeys for Meat, Eggs, Religious Purposes
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Ancient Zapotecs Kept and Bred Turkeys for Meat, Eggs, Religious Purposes

A team of archaeologists excavating the Mitla Fortress, a Zapotec site in Oaxaca, Mexico, dating to the Classic to Early Postclassic period (300-1200 CE), has uncovered the remains…

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Israeli Archaeologists Unearth First-Temple Period Gate-Shrine
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Israeli Archaeologists Unearth First-Temple Period Gate-Shrine

Archaeologists excavating at the site of the ancient Biblical city of Tel Lachish have unearthed a gate-shrine dating to the 8th century BC (First Temple period). Lachish gate-shrine.…

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Middle Stone Age Humans Used Innovative Heating Techniques to Make Tools
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Middle Stone Age Humans Used Innovative Heating Techniques to Make Tools

Early humans living in southern Africa in the Middle Stone Age after 65,000 years ago used advanced heating techniques to produce silcrete blades, according to a new study.…

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Stone Age Humans Hunted Cave Lions for Their Pelts, Research Suggests
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Stone Age Humans Hunted Cave Lions for Their Pelts, Research Suggests

According to a new study, Stone Age humans may have hunted Eurasian cave lions (Panthera leo spelaea) for their pelts, perhaps contributing to their extinction. Cave lion (Panthera…

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First Temple-Period Papyrus Mentioning ‘Jerusalem’ Found
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First Temple-Period Papyrus Mentioning ‘Jerusalem’ Found

Archaeologists with the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) have uncovered a papyrus fragment that includes the earliest reference to Jerusalem in an extra-Biblical document, written in ancient Hebrew script…

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Nan Madol: Archaeologists Uncover Earliest Evidence of Chiefdom in Pacific
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Nan Madol: Archaeologists Uncover Earliest Evidence of Chiefdom in Pacific

Nan Madol, an ancient administrative and the former capital of the Micronesian island of Pohnpei, was the earliest among the Pacific islands to be ruled by a single…

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Archaeologists Unearth Bronze Age City in Iraq
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Archaeologists Unearth Bronze Age City in Iraq

An international team of archaeologists has uncovered the remains of a large Bronze Age settlement not far from the town of Dohuk in northern Iraq. The mound of…

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Archaeologists Find Pharaonic Boat Burial at Abydos
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Archaeologists Find Pharaonic Boat Burial at Abydos

Archaeological excavations at Abydos, Egypt, have revealed the remains of a subterranean boat burial dating to the reign of the pharaoh Senwosret III (c. 1850 BC), says an…

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Swedish Researchers Find Submerged Mesolithic Settlement
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Swedish Researchers Find Submerged Mesolithic Settlement

A team of researchers headed by Lund University’s Professor Dan Hammarlund has uncovered an exceptionally well-preserved Mesolithic site off the Baltic Sea coast at Haväng in south-eastern Sweden.…

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Early Evidence of Dairying Discovered along Mediterranean Coast
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Early Evidence of Dairying Discovered along Mediterranean Coast

An international research group has found evidence that humans have been utilizing milk and dairy products across the northern Mediterranean region from the onset of agriculture – approximately…

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Archaeologists Virtually Recreate House of Caecilius Iucundus in Pompeii
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Archaeologists Virtually Recreate House of Caecilius Iucundus in Pompeii

An international team of researchers led by Lund University archaeologists has virtually reconstructed a large house of the Pompeian banker Lucius Caecilius Iucundus. A research paper about the…

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Ancient Tools, Bones Reveal Humans Arrived in South America Earlier than Thought
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Ancient Tools, Bones Reveal Humans Arrived in South America Earlier than Thought

Early Homo sapiens arrived in South America earlier than believed, new research shows. Sample of stone tools (scrapers, flakes and bipolar cobble) found at the Arroyo Seco 2…

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En-Gedi Scroll Finally Deciphered
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En-Gedi Scroll Finally Deciphered

An international team of researchers led by University of Kentucky scientist Prof. Brent Seales has unlocked the text in the early Leviticus scroll from En Gedi — the…

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Researchers Identify Archaic Hominins Associated with Chatelperronian Tool Technology
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Researchers Identify Archaic Hominins Associated with Chatelperronian Tool Technology

An international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany has demonstrated that Neanderthals were responsible for the Châtelperronian, a transitional industry…

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Underwater Archaeologists Find Ancient Human Skeleton in Antikythera Shipwreck
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Underwater Archaeologists Find Ancient Human Skeleton in Antikythera Shipwreck

An international group of archaeologists led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports has discovered a 2,050-year-old human skeleton during the…

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8,000-Year-Old Female Figurine Found at Çatalhöyük
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8,000-Year-Old Female Figurine Found at Çatalhöyük

Archaeologists digging at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in Central Anatolia, Turkey, have discovered an ancient female figurine, about 8,000 years old. 8,000-year-old female figurine from Çatalhöyük, Central…

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Archaeologists Unearth Two Marble Statues of Aphrodite in Petra
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Archaeologists Unearth Two Marble Statues of Aphrodite in Petra

A team of archaeologists from North Carolina State University and East Carolina University has discovered two marble statues of Aphrodite, the Greco-Roman goddess of love, in the ancient…

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Archaeologists Find Evidence of Domesticated Rice in China 9,000 Years Ago
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Archaeologists Find Evidence of Domesticated Rice in China 9,000 Years Ago

The earliest evidence of domesticated rice (Oryza sativa), one of the world’s most important cereal grains, has been found in China, and it’s 9,000 years old. Left: phytoliths…

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Iberian Megalithic Tombs: 6,000-Year-Old Lensless Telescopes?
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Iberian Megalithic Tombs: 6,000-Year-Old Lensless Telescopes?

A team of astronomers from the UK is exploring what might be described as the first astronomical observing tool, potentially used by humans around 4,000 BC. The view…

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Mosaics with Old Testament Scenes Revealed in Roman-Era Synagogue in Israel
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Mosaics with Old Testament Scenes Revealed in Roman-Era Synagogue in Israel

Beautiful 1,500-year-old mosaics depicting Noah’s ark, animals, and the parting of the Red Sea have been discovered by archaeologists excavating a synagogue at Huqoq, an ancient Jewish village…

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Must Farm: Bronze Age Settlement Sheds Light on Everyday Life
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Must Farm: Bronze Age Settlement Sheds Light on Everyday Life

Archaeologists from the University of Cambridge have made remarkable discoveries about everyday life in the Bronze Age during the excavation of ancient circular wooden houses at Must Farm,…

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Hoard of Hasmonean Period Silver Coins Unearthed in Israel
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Hoard of Hasmonean Period Silver Coins Unearthed in Israel

A hoard of 16 rare silver coins dating to 135-126 BC (Hasmonean period) has been found by a team of Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists in Modi’in, a city…

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Archaeologists Find 40,000-Year-Old Rope-Making Tool in Germany
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Archaeologists Find 40,000-Year-Old Rope-Making Tool in Germany

Archaeologists excavating a cave in the Swabian Jura of southwestern Germany have found what they believe is a rope-making tool nearly 40,000 years old. A 40,000-year-old rope-making tool…

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Statue Fragment of Ancient Egyptian Official Found in Israel
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Statue Fragment of Ancient Egyptian Official Found in Israel

Israeli archaeologists have found a large fragment of a limestone Egyptian statue dating to the third millennium BC at Tel-Hazor, site of the Biblical city Hazor. A fragment…

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Tiny Bronze Figure of Ceres Unearthed at Ancient Roman Fort
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Tiny Bronze Figure of Ceres Unearthed at Ancient Roman Fort

Amateur archaeologist has found a beautifully crafted miniature bronze figure of the Roman goddess Ceres at Arbeia Roman Fort in South Shields, UK. Councilor Alan Kerr at Arbeia…

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Roman-Era Pottery Workshop Unearthed in Northern Israel
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Roman-Era Pottery Workshop Unearthed in Northern Israel

Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) have unearthed a 1,600-year-old (Roman period) pottery workshop at the archaeological site of Bat el-Jabal in Shlomi, a town in northern…

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Hominins Used Stone Tools to Butcher Rhinos, Other Animals 250,000 Years Ago
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Hominins Used Stone Tools to Butcher Rhinos, Other Animals 250,000 Years Ago

New research led by University of Victoria’s April Nowell reveals surprisingly sophisticated adaptations by early humans living 250,000 years ago in Shishan Marsh, a former desert oasis in…

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Scientists Find Geological Evidence of China’s Legendary ‘Great Flood’
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Scientists Find Geological Evidence of China’s Legendary ‘Great Flood’

An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Qinglong Wu of Peking University and Nanjing Normal University, has uncovered geological evidence for the ‘Great Flood,’ a disastrous event…

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400-Year-Old Petroglyphs Found on Hawaii Shoreline
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400-Year-Old Petroglyphs Found on Hawaii Shoreline

Two lucky tourists from Texas made an incredible archaeological discovery during a July visit to Hawaii. They found a rare series of petroglyphs on Hawaii’s Waianae coast on…

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Ancient People of Teotihuacan May Have Bred Cottontails, Jackrabbits
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Ancient People of Teotihuacan May Have Bred Cottontails, Jackrabbits

Humans living Teotihuacan, a sacred pre-Columbian city that flourished between 1 CE and 600 CE and was once the largest in the Americas, may have bred and managed…

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3,200-Year-Old Tomb with Stunning Artifacts Discovered on Cyprus
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3,200-Year-Old Tomb with Stunning Artifacts Discovered on Cyprus

Archaeologists from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, who are excavating the Bronze Age city of Hala Sultan Tekke/Dromolaxia Vizatzia on the island of Cyprus, have uncovered a spectacularly…

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Britain’s Oldest ‘Great Circles’ Were Built by Ancient Astronomers
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Britain’s Oldest ‘Great Circles’ Were Built by Ancient Astronomers

New research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports has statistically proven that the earliest standing stone monuments of Britain were constructed specifically in line with the…

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Hidden Images Revealed in Pre-Hispanic Mixtec Manuscript ‘Codex Selden’
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Hidden Images Revealed in Pre-Hispanic Mixtec Manuscript ‘Codex Selden’

An international team of scientists led by Leiden University researcher Ludo Snijders has used the so-called ‘hyperspectral imaging’ to uncover the details of a previously unknown Mexican book…

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Religious Text on Ancient Stele Reveals Name of Etruscan Goddess
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Religious Text on Ancient Stele Reveals Name of Etruscan Goddess

A team of scholars translating a unique inscription on a 2,500-year-old Etruscan stele has discovered the name Uni – an important female goddess. Inscribed surfaces of the 2,500-year-old…

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Crocodile Stone Yields New Clues about Ancient Zapotec City of Lambityeco
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Crocodile Stone Yields New Clues about Ancient Zapotec City of Lambityeco

An international team led by Field Museum archaeologists Gary Feinman and Linda Nicholas recently unearthed a carved stone crocodile at an excavation site in the ancient city of…

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